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John Buckle

Member Since 21 Apr 2015
Offline Last Active Dec 13 2017 07:51 AM
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Topics I've Started

Books - Should Romans 6 23 Be Used in Evangelism?

03 November 2017 - 01:31 PM

File Name: Should Romans 6 23 Be Used in Evangelism?
File Submitter: John Buckle
File Submitted: 03 Nov 2017
File Category: Books
Author: Dr. Charlie Bing
theWord Version: 3.x - 4.x
Suggest New Tag:: Romans 6 23, Evangelism

Introduction

Romans 6:23
For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

This well-known verse is often used when presenting the gospel to show that unsaved sinners will pay for their sin with eternal separation from God (death), and that they can escape that fate through the gift of eternal life that Jesus Christ provides. Isaiah that how this verse should be interpreted and applied?

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Books - Two Judgments and Four Types of People (Luke 19 11-27)

22 October 2017 - 09:37 AM

File Name: Two Judgments and Four Types of People (Luke 19 11-27)
File Submitter: John Buckle
File Submitted: 22 Oct 2017
File Category: Books
Author: Dr. Robert N WIlkin
theWord Version: 3.x - 4.x
Suggest New Tag:: Judgments, Types of People, Luke 19 11-27

Introduction: One Judgment, Or Two?

The doctrine of the last days, eschatology, is closely related to the doctrine of salvation, soteriology. Unfortunately, errors in eschatology often translated into errors in the doctrine of salvation.[1]
For example, it has become common for Evangelical pastors and scholars to speak of one final judgment in which all people will be judged to determine whether they receive something they call final salvation[2] (or eschatological salvation).



[1] See Grant Hawley, “Dispensationalism and Free Grace: Intimately Linked, Parts 1 and 2” Journal of the Grace Evangelical Society (Spring and Autumn 2011).

[2] Nearly all who use the expression final salvation today suggest it refers to receiving the verdict that your works confirm or cause you to be finally justified by Christ at the final judgment. Final salvation is future and it is unknown. That is, you can’t know if you will end up spending eternity with Jesus or with Satan.

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Books - Another View of Faith and Works in James 2

20 October 2017 - 10:03 AM

File Name: Another View of Faith and Works in James 2
File Submitter: John Buckle
File Submitted: 20 Oct 2017
File Category: Books
Author: Dr. Robert N WIlkin
theWord Version: 3.x - 4.x
Suggest New Tag:: Faith, Works, James 2, Lordship Salvation

How one understands any given passage is dependent, at least in part, on his understanding of the book in which it is found. James 2:1426 is a prime example.
E. D. Hirsch, in his book Validity in Interpretation suggests that the interpreter of any literature must make a series of genre guesses. Correct guesses, those that rightly understand what the author is saying, are called intrinsic genres. Incorrect guesses are extrinsic genres.[1]
Hirsch illustrates that extrinsic genre guesses result in a wrong understanding of the author’s point with Donne’s poem, “A Valediction Forbidding Mourning.” When his students misinterpreted the poem, he attempted to correct them. They were unmoved, however, because they felt the particulars of the poem fit their genre conception. They were unwilling to see that Hirsch’s genre guess better fit the particulars.[2]
It is the contention of this article that something similar has occurred in the exegesis of Jas 2:14-26. The genre conception most often given somewhat fits the particulars of the passage; thus proponents of that view see no need to consider any other view. However, there is good reason to believe that another genre understanding better fits the particulars of the passage.
James 2:14-26 has long been recognized as a crux passage. A recent article in Bibliotheca Sacra by C. Ryan Jenkins laid out four interpretations:[3]
View A. In this view James 2 shows that works are instrumental in a sinner’s justification before God. Those who propose this view assert that James was arguing that a sinner’s acceptance with God depends on both faith and works.
View B. James was dealing with physical deliverance from the devastating affects of sin. James was not addressing unbelievers concerning [eternal] salvation…James then was referring to justification/vindication only before others in a nonsalvific context.[4]
View C. James was stating that a Christian’s justification before God depends not on faith alone but, on faith and works and…he was directly refuting Pauline theology (as expressed in Romans 4 and Galatians 2–3). This view is not committed to the inerrancy of Scripture.
View D. James’s concern was to refute antinomianism by showing that one’s true conversion will be “justified” objectively by works… James sought to show that a person who possessed faith in Christ will be justified (i.e., vindicated as a true Christian) by his or her works, and that a mere profession of faith that is not vindicated or evidenced by works is not characteristic of genuine conversion.
We might call these views respectively, the Arminian view, the temporal deliverance view, the New Testament scholar view (since many scholars see no need to harmonize Scripture or uphold inerrancy), and the traditional view. The traditional view is the one defended by Jenkins in his article and it is the traditional Reformed understanding of James 2.
In this article I will attempt to show three things. First, the traditional understanding has some difficulties. Second, the temporal deliverance understanding has points in its favor. And third, the traditional Reformed understanding of the perseverance of the saints is not dependent on the traditional understanding of James 2.



[1] E. D. Hirsch, Jr., Validity in Interpretation (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1967), 88-89.

[2] Ibid., 73-74.


[3] C. Ryan Jenkins, “Faith and Works in Paul and James,” Bibliotheca Sacra (January–March 2002): 63-64.

[4] Italics his.


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Books - The Doctrine of Divine Election Reconsidered Election to Service, Not to Everla...

08 October 2017 - 09:01 AM

File Name: The Doctrine of Divine Election Reconsidered Election to Service, Not to Everlasting Life
File Submitter: John Buckle
File Submitted: 08 Oct 2017
File Updated: 08 Oct 2017
File Category: Books
Author: Dr. - Robert N Wilkin
theWord Version: 3.x - 4.x
Suggest New Tag:: Divine Election, Election to Service

Because of the strong influence of Calvinism in Evangelicalism today, the doctrine of election has been widely understood to concern one’s eternal destiny. Those whom God elected will spend eternity with the Lord. Those whom God did not elect will spend eternity in the lake of fire.

While some find this doctrine to be disturbing, since humans seemingly have nothing at all to do with where they will spend eternity, others find this doctrine liberating. After all, many feel that if their eternal destiny has been predetermined by God and they can do nothing to change that, then they can relax and rest in whatever God decided.

There have always been people who questioned the Calvinist understanding of election on philosophical grounds. How could God be good if He created beings with no opportunity to escape an eternity of eternal torment? Indeed, if we believe that only a small percentage of humanity will avoid eternal condemnation, as Calvinism teaches, then the goodness and fairness of God is even more in question. But this a philosophical or theological approach, not a Biblical one.

If the Scriptures teach that God elected some to everlasting life and either bypassed most or elected them to eternal torment, then we should embrace that as true even if we neither like it nor understand it. What God says is true. We don’t make it true by liking or understanding it.

In this article we will consider the Biblical doctrine of election. My thesis is that election is not about eternal destiny, but about service and eternal reward. God has chosen a nation, a city, a Person, and many individuals to serve and glorify Him both now and in the life to come.

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Books - Is Our Understanding of Baptism All Wet

03 October 2017 - 10:15 AM

File Name: Is Our Understanding of Baptism All Wet
File Submitter: John Buckle
File Submitted: 03 Oct 2017
File Category: Books
Author: Brad Doskocil
theWord Version: 3.x - 4.x
Suggest New Tag:: Baptism

Recently, Bob Wilkin wrote a book that looked at how many words in the Bible are misunderstood.1 Perhaps another Bible word that is often misunderstood is baptism and its cognates: baptize and baptist. We will look at the use and meaning of this word group. The discussion will begin with a review of the meaning of the underlying Greek words and examine their usage. Afterward, I will classify and examine the various kinds of baptisms presented in the New Testament (NT). Finally, some of the more difficult passages in the NT which contain these words will be considered.

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