Jump to content


Submitter

SUPPORT TOPIC File Information

  • Submitted: May 20 2015 07:06 PM
  • Last Updated: May 20 2015 07:17 PM
  • File Size: 19.25MB
  • Views: 4147
  • Downloads: 563
  • Author: Jean-Henri Merle d'Aubigné
  • theWord Version: 3.x - 4.x
  • Tab Name: History - Reformation
  • Suggest New Tag:: Reformation History, Reformation, Protestant

Support WordModules.com

  • If our theWord modules have blessed you, please consider a small donation.


    Your donation pays the actual, out-of-pocket expenses of running this ministry.

    Your donation pays only for dedicated server hosting, bandwidth, software licenses, and capital equipment (scanners, OCR equipment, etc).


    Enter Amount


    You do not need a paypal account to donate online.


    You may also donate by check to:


    Josh Bond

    699 Harris Lane, #699

    Gallatin, TN 37066

theWord Module Download:
Download History of the Reformation of the Sixteenth Century (5 vol) 1.0

* * * * * 4 Votes
History Church History Renaissance (1400-1650)
Screenshots
Author:
Jean-Henri Merle d'Aubigné

theWord Version:
3.x - 4.x

Tab Name:
History - Reformation

Suggest New Tag::
Reformation History, Reformation, Protestant

"Jean Henri Merle d’Aubigne’s History of the Reformation of the Sixteenth Century provides one of the absolute best accounts of the Reformation through d’Aubigne’s compelling, informative, and prestigious writings. This collection’s five volumes and 20 books teach you everything you need to know about the Reformation during the sixteenth century as it spread across Europe and changed beliefs around the world. This is a must-read for scholars, students, and anyone else wanting to learn and understand the history of one of the greatest revolutions of all time." Logos Product Description

Public Domain 1,852 pages

VOLUME 1


CONTENTS


BOOK ONE

State of Matters Before the Reformation


CHAPTER I

Christianity—Formation of the Papacy—Unity of the Church—The Decretals—Hildebrand—Corruption of Doctrine

CHAPTER II

Grace and Works—Pelagianism—Penances—Indulgences—Supererogation—Purgatory—Taxation—Jubilee

CHAPTER III

Relics—Easter Merriment—Corruption of the Clergy—A Priest’s Family—Education—Ignorance

CHAPTER IV

Christianity Imperishable—Opposition to Rome—Frederick the Wise—His Character—His Anticipation

CHAPTER V

The Empire—National Character—Switzerland—Italy—Spain—Portugal—France—Netherlands—England—Scotland—The North—Russia—Poland—Bohemia—Hungary

CHAPTER VI

State of Theology—Witnesses for the Truth—The Vaudois—Wickliffe—Huss—Savonarola—John Wessel—Prolés

CHAPTER VII

Literature—Dante—Printing—Reuchlin—His Struggle with the Dominicans

CHAPTER VIII

Erasmus—His Genius—His ‘Praise of Folly’—His Greek Testament—His Influence—His Failings

CHAPTER IX

The Nobles—Hütten—‘Letters of some Obscure Men’—Seckingen—Cronberg—Hans Sachs—General Fermentation


BOOK SECOND

Youth, Conversion, and First Labours, of Luther


CHAPTER I

Luther—His Parentage—The Paternal Roof—Strict Discipline—School—The Shunammite—His Studies—University

CHAPTER II

Scholasticism and the Classics—Luther’s Piety—His Discovery of a Bible—His Sickness—The Thunderstorm—His Entrance into a Convent

CHAPTER III

His Father’s Anger—Servile Employments—His Studies—The Bible—Hebrew and Greek—His Agony during Mass—Faints

CHAPTER IV

Staupitz—His Piety—His Visitation—His Conversation—Presents Luther with a Bible—The Old Monk—Luther’s Consecration—His Call to Wittemberg

CHAPTER V

The University of Wittemberg—Luther’s First Employment—Biblical Lectures—Preaching at Wittemberg—The Old Chapel

CHAPTER VI

Luther’s Journey to Rome—A Convent on the Po—Luther’s Behaviour at Rome—Corruption of the Romish Clergy—Prevailing Immorality—Pilate’s Staircase

CHAPTER VII

Doctor’s Degree—Carlstadt—Luther’s Oath—First Views of Reformation—The Schoolmen—Spalatin

CHAPTER VIII

‘Popular Declamations’—Moral Purity of Luther—Mysticism—Spenlein—Justification by Faith—Necessity of Works

CHAPTER IX

First Theses—Visit to the Convents—Dresden—Erfurt—Tornator Peace and the Cross—Labours—The Plague

CHAPTER X

Luther and the Elector—Duke George—Luther at Court—Dinner Emser’s Supper

CHAPTER XI

Theses—Human Nature—Rationalism—Eck—Urban Regius—Luther’s Modesty


BOOK THIRD

The Indulgences and Theses


CHAPTER I

Cortege—Tezel—His Discourse—Sale of Indulgences—Public Penance—Letter of Indulgence—Feasting and Debauchery

CHAPTER II

The Soul in the Burying-Ground—Shoemaker of Hagenau—Myconius—Stratagem—Miner of Schneeberg

CHAPTER III

Leo X—His Necessities—Albert—His Character—Franciscans and Dominicans

CHAPTER IV

Tezel Approaches—Luther in the Confessional—Tezel’s Rage—Luther’s Discourse—The Elector’s Dream

CHAPTER V

Luther’s Theses—Letter to Albert—Dissemination of the Theses

CHAPTER VI

Reuchlin—Erasmus—Flek—Bibra—The Emperor—The Pope—Myconius—The Monks—Adelman—An Old Priest—Bishop of Brandenburg—Luther’s Moving Principle

CHAPTER VII

Tezel’s Attack—Luther’s Reply—Luther and Spalatin—Study of Scripture—Scheurl and Luther—Luther pleads for the People—A new Suit

CHAPTER VIII

Disputation at Frankfort—Tezel’s Theses—Knipstrow—Luther’s Theses burnt—Tezel’s Theses burnt

CHAPTER IX

Prierio—His Dialogue—Luther’s Reply—Hochstraten—Eck—‘The Obelisks’—‘The Asterisks,’

CHAPTER X

Popular Writings—Lord’s Prayer—Sermon on Repentance

CHAPTER XI

Apprehensions of Luther’s Friends—Journey to Heidelberg—Bibra—The Palatinate Castle—The Paradoxes—Bucer—Brentz—Snepf—The Old Professor


BOOK FOURTH

Luther Before the Legate


CHAPTER I

‘Solutions’—Leo X—Luther to the Bishop—To the Pope—To the Vicar-General—Rovere to the Elector—Discourse on Excommunication

CHAPTER II

Diet of Augsburg—The Emperor to the Pope—Luther cited to Rome—Luther’s Peace—Intercession of the University—Papal Brief—The Pope to the Elector

CHAPTER III

Schwarzerd—His Wife—Philip Melancthon—His Genius—His Studies—Call to Wittemberg—Leipsic—Parallel between Luther and Melancthon—Education

CHAPTER IV

Luther and Staupitz—Order to Appear—Luther’s Departure for Augsburg—Weimar—Nuremberg

CHAPTER V

Arrival at Augsburg—De Vio—Serra-Longa—Safe-Conduct—Luther to Melancthon

CHAPTER VI

First Appearance—Conditions of Rome—Propositions to Retract—Luther’s Reply—Impressions on both Sides—Arrival of Staupitz

CHAPTER VII

Communication to the Legate—Second Appearance—Luther’s Declaration—The Legate’s Reply—The Legate’s Volubility—Luther’s Request

CHAPTER VIII

Third Appearance—Treasury of Indulgences—Humble Request—Legate’s Rage—Luther Retires

CHAPTER IX

De Vio and Staupitz—Staupitz and Luther—Luther and Spalatin Communion—Departure of Staupitz and Link—Luther to Cajetan—Luther’s Departure—Appeal to the Pope

CHAPTER X

Luther’s Flight—Luther’s Wish—The Legate to the Elector—The Elector to the Legate—Prosperity of the University

CHAPTER XI

Thoughts of Departure—Adieus to the Church—Critical Moment—Luther’s Courage—Discontentment at Rome—Papal Bull—Appeal to a Council



VOLUME 2


CONTENTS


BOOK FIFTH

The Discussion of Leipsic, 1519


CHAPTER I

Luther’s Dangers—God saves Luther—The Pope sends a Chamberlain—The Legate’s Journey—Briefs of Rome—Circumstances favourable to the Reformation—Miltitz with Spalatin—Tezel’s Terror—Caresses of Miltitz—A Recantation demanded—Luther refuses, but offers to be silent—Agreement between Luther and the Nuncio—The Legate’s Embrace—Tezel overwhelmed by the Legate—Luther to the Pope—Nature of the Reformation—Luther against Separation—De Vio and Miltitz at Treves—Luther’s Cause extends in different Countries—Luther’s Writings the commencement of the Reformation.

CHAPTER II

The War seems ended in Germany—Eck Revives the Contest—Debate between Eck and Carlstadt—The Question of the Pope—Luther Replies—Alarm of Luther’s Friends—Luther’s Courage—Truth triumphs single-handed—Refusal of Duke George—Delight of Mosellanus and Fears of Erasmus.

CHAPTER III

Arrival of Eck and the Wittembergers—Amsdorff—The Students Carlstadt’s Accident—Placard—Eck and Luther—Pleissenburg Shall Judges be appointed?—Luther objects.

CHAPTER IV

The Procession—Mass—Mosellanus—Veni, Sancte Spiritus!—Portraits of Luther and Carlstadt—Doctor Eck—Carlstadt’s Books—Merit of Congruity—Natural Powers—Scholastic Distinction—Point where Rome and the Reformation Separate—Grace gives Man freedom—Carlstadt’s Note-Book—Commotion in the Auditory—Melancthon during the Debate—Manœuvres of Eck—Luther Preaches—The Citizens of Leipsic.—Quarrels of Students and Quarrels of Teachers.

CHAPTER V

Hierarchy and Rationalism—Two Peasants’ Sons—Eck and Luther begin—The Head of the Church—The Primacy of Rome—Equality of Bishops—Peter the Foundation—Christ the Foundation—Eck insinuates that Luther is a Hussite—Luther on the Doctrine of Huss—Agitation in the Audience—Pleasantry of Dr. Eck—The Word alone—The Court Fool—Luther at Mass—Saying of the Duke—Purgatory—Close of the Discussion.

CHAPTER VI

Interest felt by the Laity—Luther’s Opinion—Admissions and Boastings of Dr. Eck—Effects of the Discussion—Poliander—Cellarius—The Young Prince of Anhalt—The Students of Leipsic—Cruciger—Calling of Melancthon—Emancipation of Luther.

CHAPTER VII

Eck attacks Melancthon—Melancthon’s Defence—Interpretation of Scripture—Luther’s Firmness—The Bohemian Brethren—Emser—Staupitz.

CHAPTER VIII

Epistle to the Galatians—Christ for us—Blindness of Luther’s Adversaries—First Ideas on the Supper—Is the Sacrament Sufficient without Faith?—Luther a Bohemian—Eck Attacked—Eck sets out for Rome.


BOOK SIXTH

The Bull of Rome

1520


CHAPTER I

Character of Maximilian—The Competitors for the Empire—Charles—Francis I—Inclination of the Germans—The Crown offered to Frederick—Charles is Elected.

CHAPTER II

Luther writes to the Emperor—Luther’s Dangers—Instructions of Frederick to the Court of Rome—Luther’s Sentiments—Melancthon’s Fears—The German Nobles favourable to the Reformation—Schaumburg—Seckingen—Ulric de Hutten—Luther’s Confidence—Luther’s Greater Freedom—Faith the Source of Works—What Faith gives—Luther Judging his own Writings.

CHAPTER III

The Papacy Attacked—Appeal to the Nobility—The Three Walls—All Christians are Priests—The Magistrate’s duty to Correct the Clergy—Abuses of Rome—Ruin of Italy—Dangers of Germany—The Pope—The Legates—The Monks—The Marriage of Priests—Celibacy—Festivals—The Bohemians—Charity—The Universities—The Empire—The Emperor must retake Rome—A Book not Published—Luther’s Modesty—Success of the Address.

CHAPTER IV

Preparations at Rome—Motives to resist the Papacy—Eck at Rome—Eck gains the Day—The Pope is the World—God produces the Separation—A Swiss Priest pleads for Luther—The Roman Consistory—Preamble of the Bull—Condemnation of Luther.

CHAPTER V

Wittemberg—Melancthon—His Marriage—Catharine—Domestic Life—Beneficence—Good Humour—Christ and Antiquity—Labour—Love of Letters—His Mother—Outbreak among the Students.

CHAPTER VI

The Gospel in Italy—Discourse on the Mass—The Babylonish Captivity of the Church—Baptism—Abolition of Vows—Progress of the Reformation.

CHAPTER VII

New Negotiations—Miltitz and the Augustins of Eisleben—Deputation to Luther—Miltitz and the Elector—Conference at Lichtemberg—Luther’s Letter to the Pope—Book presented to the Pope—Union of the Believer with Christ—Freedom and Bondage.

CHAPTER VIII

The Bull in Germany—Eck’s Reception—The Bull at Wittemberg—Interposition of Zuinglius.

CHAPTER IX

Luther Examines himself in the presence of God—Luther’s opinion of the Bull—A Neutral Family—Luther on the Bull, and against the Bull of Antichrist—The Pope prohibits Faith—Effects of the Bull—The Faggot Pile of Louvain.

CHAPTER X

Decisive steps by the Reformer—Luther’s Appeal to a General Council—Struggle at close quarters—The Bull burned by Luther—Meaning of this bold act—Luther in the Academic Chair—Luther against the Pope—New Work by Melancthon—How Luther encourages his Friends—Progress of the Contest—Melancthon’s Opinion of the timid—Luther’s work on the Bible—Doctrine of Grace—Luther’s Recantation.

CHAPTER XI

Coronation of Charles V—The Nuncio Aleander—Will Luther’s Books be burnt?—Aleander and the Emperor—The Nuncios and the Elector—The Son of Duke John pleads for Luther—Luther’s Calmness—The Elector protects Luther—Reply of the Nuncios—Erasmus at Cologne—Erasmus with the Elector—Declaration of Erasmus—Advice of Erasmus—System of Charles V.

CHAPTER XII

Luther on Confession—True Absolution—Antichrist—Rally around Luther—Satires—Ulric von Hutten—Lucas Cranach—The Carnival at Wittemberg—Staupitz Intimidated—Luther’s Labours—Luther’s Humility—Progress of the Reformation.


BOOK SEVENTH

The Diet of Worms

1521. (January–May.)


CHAPTER I

Conquest by the Word of God—The Diet of Worms—Difficulties—Charles demands Luther—The Elector to Charles—State of Men’s Minds—Aleander’s Alarm—The Elector sets out without Luther—Aleander awakens Rome—Excommunication of the Pope, and Communion with Christ—Fulmination of the Bull—Luther’s Motives in the Reformation.

CHAPTER II

A Foreign Prince—Advice of Politicians—Conference between the Confessor and the Elector’s Chancellor—Uselessness of these Manœuvres—Aleander’s Activity—Luther’s Sayings—Charles gives in to the Pope.

CHAPTER III

Aleander admitted to the Diet—Aleander’s Address—Luther accused—Rome defended—Appeal to Charles against Luther—Effect of the Nuncie’s Address.

CHAPTER IV

Sentiments of the Princes—Speech of Duke George—Character of the Reformation—A Hundred and one Grievances—Charles Yields—Tactics of Aleander—The Grandees of Spain—Luther’s Peace—Death and not Retractation.

CHAPTER V

Will a Safe-conduct be given?—Safe-conduct—Will Luther go?—Holy Thursday at Rome—The Pope and Luther.

CHAPTER VI

Luther’s courage—Bugenhagen at Wittemberg—Persecutions in Pomerania—Melancthon wishes to set out with Luther—Amsdorff—Schurff—Suaven—Hutten to Charles V.

CHAPTER VII

Departure for the Diet of Worms—Luther’s Adieu—His Condemnation Published—Cavalcade near Erfurt—Meeting of Jonas and Luther—Luther in his old Convent—Luther Preaches at Erfurt—Incident—Faith and Works—Concourse of People—Luther’s Courage—Luther to Spalatin—Halt at Frankfort—Fears at Worms—Plan of the Imperialists—Luther’s Firmness.

CHAPTER VIII

Entry into Worms—Chant for the Dead—Council held by Charles V—Capito and the Temporisers—Concourse around Luther—Citation—Hutten to Luther—Proceeds to the Diet—Saying of Freundsberg—Imposing Assembly—The Chancellor’s Address—Luther’s Reply—His Wisdom—Saying of Charles V—Alarm—Triumph—Luther’s Firmness—Insults from the Spaniards—Council—Luther’s Trouble and Prayer—Might of the Reformation—Luther’s Oath to Scripture—The Court of the Diet—Luther’s Address—Three kinds of Writings—He demands Proof of his Error—Solemn Warnings—He Repeats his Address in Latin—Here I am: I can’t do otherwise—The “weakness” of God—New Attempt.

CHAPTER IX

Victory—Tumult and Calm—Duke Errick’s Glass of Beer—The Elector and Spalatin—Message from the Emperor—Wish to violate the Safe-conduct—Strong Opposition—Enthusiasm for Luther—Voice for Conciliation—The Elector’s Fear—Assemblage at Luther’s Lodgings—Philip of Hesse.

CHAPTER X

Conference with the Archbishop of Treves—Weho’s Advice to Luther—Luther’s Replies—Private Conversation—Visit of Cochlœus—Supper at the Archbishop’s—Attempt on the Hotel of Rhodes—A Council proposed—Last Interview between Luther and the Archbishop—Visit to a sick Friend—Luther ordered to quit Worms.

CHAPTER XI

Luther’s Departure—Journey from Worms—Luther to Cranach—Luther to Charles V—Luther with the Abbot of Hirschfeld—The Curate of Eisenach—Several Princes leave the Diet—Charles signs Luther’s Condemnation—The Edict of Worms—Luther with his Parents—Luther attacked and carried off—The ways of God—Wartburg—Luther a Prisoner


BOOK EIGHTH

The Swiss

1484–1522


CHAPTER I

Movements in Switzerland—Source of the Reformation—Democratic Character—Foreign Service—Morality—The Tockenburg An Alpine Hut—A Pastoral Family.

CHAPTER II

Young Ulric at Wesen—At Bale—At Berne—The Dominican Convent—Jetzer—The Apparitions—The Passion of the Lay Brother The Imposture—Discovery and Punishment—Zuinglius at Vienna At Bale—Music at Bale—Wittembach teaches the Gospel—Leo Juda—The Curate of Glaris.

CHAPTER III

Love of War—Schinner—Pension from the Pope—The Labyrinth—Zuinglius in Italy—Principle of Reform—Zuinglius and Luther—Zuinglius and Erasmus—Zuinglius and the Elders—Paris and Glaris.

CHAPTER IV

Zuinglius in regard to Erasmus—Oswald Myconius—The Vagrants—Œcolampadius—Zuinglius at Marignan—Zuinglius and Italy—Method of Zuinglius—Commencement of Reform—Discovery.

CHAPTER V

Meinrad of Hohenzollern—Our Lady of Einsidlen—Calling of Zuinglius—The Abbot—Geroldsek—Companionship in Study—The Bible Copied—Zuinglius and Superstition—First Opposition to Error—Sensation—Hedio—Zuinglius and the Legates—The Honours of Rome—The Bishop of Constance—Samson and Indulgences—Stapfer—Charity of Zuinglius—His Friends.

CHAPTER VI

Zurich—The College of Canons—Election to the Cathedral—Fable’s Accusations—Confession of Zuinglius—The Designs of God Unfolded—Farewell to Einsidlen—Arrival at Zurich—Courageous Declaration of Zuinglius—First Sermons—Effects—Opposition—Character of Zuinglius—Taste for Music—Arrangement of the Day—Circulation by Hawkers.

CHAPTER VII

Indulgences—Samson at Berne—Samson at Baden—the Dean of Bremgarten—Young Henry Bullinger—Samson and the Dean—Internal Struggles of Zuinglius—Zuinglius against Indulgences—Samson Dismissed.

CHAPTER VIII

The Labours of Zuinglius—The Baths of Pfeffers—God’s time—The Great Death—Zuinglius seized with the Plague—His Enemies—His Friends—Convalescence—General Joy—Effect of the Plague Myconius at Lucerne—Oswald encourages Zuinglius—Zuinglius at Bale—Capito called to Mentz—Hedio at Bale—An Unnatural Son—Preparation for Battle.

CHAPTER IX

The Two Reformers—The Fall of Man—Expiation of the God-Man—No Merit in Works—Objections refuted—Power of Love to Christ—Election—Christ alone Master—Effects of this Preaching—Despondency and Courage—First Act of the Magistrate—Church and State—Attacks—Galster.

CHAPTER X

A new Combatant—The Reformer of Berne—Zuinglius encourages Haller—The Gospel at Lucerne—Oswald Persecuted—Preaching of Zuinglius—Henry Bullinger and Gerold of Knonau—Rubli at Bale—The Chaplain of the Hospital—War in Italy—Zuinglius—Foreign Service.

CHAPTER XI

Zuinglius against the Precepts of Man—Fermentation during Lent—Truth advances during Combat—The Deputies of the Bishops—Accusation before the Clergy and Council—Appeal to the Great Council—The Coadjutor and Zuinglius—Decree of the Grand Council—State of Matters—Attack by Hoffman.

CHAPTER XII

Grief and Joy in Germany—Ambush against Zuinglius—Mandate of the Bishop—Archeteles—The Bishop addresses the Diet—Prohibition to attack the Monks—Declaration of Zuinglius—The Nuns of Œtenbach—Zuinglius’ Address to Schwitz.

CHAPTER XIII

A French Monk—He Teaches in Switzerland—Dispute between the Monk and Zuinglius—Discourse of the Leader of the Johannites—The Carnival at Berne—The Eaters of the Dead—The Skull of St. Anne—Appenzel—The Grisons—Murder and Adultery—Marriage of Zuinglius.

CHAPTER XIV

How Truth Triumphs—Society at Einsidlen—Request to the Bishops—To the Confederates—The Men of Einsidlen Separate—A Scene in a Convent—A Dinner by Myconius—The Strength of the Reformers—Effect of the Petitions to Lucerne—The Council of the Diet—Haller at the Town-House—Friburg—Destitution of Oswald—Zuinglius comforts him—Oswald quits Lucerne—First Severity of the Diet—Consternation of the Brothers of Zuinglius—His Resolution—The Future—The Prayer of Zuinglius.



VOLUME 3


CONTENTS


BOOK NINTH

First Reforms.—(1521, 1522.)


CHAPTER I

Progress of the Reformation—New Period—Advantages of Luther’s Captivity—Agitation of Germany—Melancthon and Luther—Enthusiasm

CHAPTER II

Luther in the Wartburg—Object of his Captivity—Agonies—Sickness—Labour of Luther—On Confession—To Latomus—Walks

CHAPTER III

Reformation begins—Marriage of Feldkirchen—Marriage of Monks—Theses—Writes against Monachism—Luther ceases to be a Monk

CHAPTER IV

Archbishop Albert—The Idol of Halle—Luther apears—Terror at the Court—Luther to the Archbishop—The Archbishop’s Reply—Joachim of Brandenburg

CHAPTER V

Translation of the Bible—Wants of the Church—Principles of the Reformation—Alarm at Court—Luther to the Archbishop—Temptations of the Devil—Condemnation of the Sorbonne—Melancthon’s Reply—Visit to Wittemberg

CHAPTER VI

New Reforms—Gabriel Zwilling on the Mass—The University—The Elector—Monachism attacked—Emancipation of the Monks—Disturbances—Chapter of the Augustins—The Mass and Carlstadt—First Supper—Importance of the Mass in the Roman System

CHAPTER VII

Spurious Reform—The new Prophets—The Prophets at Wittemberg—Melancthon—The Elector—Luther, Carlstadt, and Images—Disorders—Luther sent for—He hesitates not—Dangers

CHAPTER VIII

Departure from the Wartburg—New Position—Luther and Primitive Catholicism—Meeting at the Black Bear—Luther to the Elector—Return to Wittemberg—Discourses at Wittemberg—Charity—the Word—How the Reformation was effected—Faith in Christ—Effect—Didymus—Carlstadt—The Prophets—Conference with Luther—End of the Struggle

CHAPTER IX

Translation of the New Testament—Faith and Scripture—Opposition—Importance of Luther’s Publication—Need of a Systematic Exposition—Melancthon’s Common Places—Original Sin—Salvation—Free-will—Effect of the Common Places

CHAPTER X

Opposition—Henry VIII—Wolsey—The Queen—Fisher—Thomas More—Luther’s Books burnt—Henry attacks Luther—Presentation to the Pope—Effect on Luther—Force and violence—His book—Reply of the Bishop of Rochester—Reply by More—Step by the King

CHAPTER XI

General Movement—The Monks—How the Reformation is Accomplished—Ordinary Believers—The Old and the New Teachers—Printing and Literature—Booksellers and Hawkers

CHAPTER XII

Luther at Zwickau—The Castle of Freyberg—Worms—Frankfort Universal movement—Wittemberg, the centre of the Reformation—Luther’s sentiments


BOOK TENTH

Agitation, Reverses, and Progress.—(1522–1526.)


CHAPTER I

Political element—Want of Enthusiasm at Rome—Siege of Pampeluna—Courage of Inigo—Transformation—Luther and Loyola—Visions—The two principles

CHAPTER II

Victory of the Pope—Death of Leo X—Oratory of Divine Love—Adrian VI—Schemes of Reform—Opposition

CHAPTER III

Diet of Nuremberg—Invasion of Solyman—The Nuncio demands the Death of Luther—The Preachers of Nuremberg—Promise of Reform—National Grievances—Decree of the Diet—Thundering Letter of the Pope—Luther’s Advice

CHAPTER IV

Persecution—Efforts of Duke George—The Convent of Antwerp—Miltenberg—The three Monks of Antwerp—The Scaffold—Martyrdom at Brussels

CHAPTER V

New Pope—The Legate Campeggio—Diet of Nuremberg—Demand of the Legate—Reply of the Diet—Project of a Secular Council—Alarm and Efforts of the Pope—Bavaria—League of Ratisbon—Rigour and Reform—Political Schisms—Opposition—Intrigues of Rome—Edict of Bruges—Rupture

CHAPTER VI

Persecution—Gaspard Tauber—A Bookseller—Cruelties in Wurtemberg, Salzburg, Bavaria, Pomerania—Henry of Zuphten

CHAPTER VII

Divisions—Lord’s Supper—Two Extremes—Carlstadt—Luther—Mysticism of the Anabaptists—Carlstadt at Orlamund—Mission of Luther—Interview at dinner—Conference of Orlamund—Carlstadt banished

CHAPTER VIII

Progress—Resistance to the Leaguers—Meeting between Philip of Hesse and Melancthen—The Landgrave gained to the Gospel—The Palatinate, Luneburg, Holstein—The Grand Master at Wittemberg

CHAPTER IX

Reformers—The Church of All Saints—Fall of the Mass—Literature—Christian Schools—Science offered to the Laity—Arts—Moral Religion, Esthetical Religion—Music—Poetry—Painting

CHAPTER X

Political ferment—Luther against Revolution—Thomas Munzer—Agitation—The Black Forest—The Twelve Articles—Luther’s Advice—Helfenstein—Advance of the Peasants—Advance of the Imperial Army—Defeat of the Peasants—Cruelty of the Princes

CHAPTER XI

Munzer at Mulhausen—Appeal to the People—March of the Princes—End of the Revolt—Influence of the Reformers—Sufferings—Change

CHAPTER XII

Two Issues—Death of Frederick—The Prince and the Reformer—Catholic Alliance—Projects of Charles—Dangers

CHAPTER XIII

The Nuns of Nimptsch—Luther’s Feelings—End of the Convent—Luther’s Marriage—Domestic Happiness

CHAPTER XIV

The Landgrave—The Elector—Prussia—Reformation—Secularisation—The Archbishop of Mentz—Conference of Friedewalt—Diet—Alliance of Torgau—Resistance of the Reformers—Alliance of Magdeburg—The Catholics redouble their efforts—Marriage of the Emperor—Threatening Letters—The two Parties



BOOK ELEVENTH

Division—Switzerland, Germany—(1523–1527).


CHAPTER I

Unity in Diversity—Primitive Faith and Liberty—Formation of Roman Unity—A Monk and Leo Juda—Theses of Zuinglius—The Discussion of January

CHAPTER II

Caresses of the Pope—Progress of the Reformation—The Image of Stadelhofen—Sacrilege—The Ornaments of the Saints

CHAPTER III

The October Discussion—Zuinglius on the Church—The Church—First Outline of Presbyterianism—Discussion on the Mass—Enthusiasts—A Voice of Wisdom—Victory—A characteristic of the Swiss Reformation—Moderation—Oswald Myconius at Zurich—The Revival of Letters—Thomas Plater of the Valois

CHAPTER IV

Diet of Lucerne—Hottinger arrested—His Death—Deputation of the Diet to Zurich—Abolition of Processions—Abolition of Images—The two Reformations—Appeal to the People

CHAPTER V

New Opposition—Œxlin carried off—The Family of the Wirths—The Mob at the Convent of Ittingen—The Diet of Zug—The Wirths seized and given up to the Diet—Condemnation

CHAPTER VI

Abolition of the Mass—Zuinglius’ Dream—Celebration of the Lord’s Supper—Brotherly Charity—Original Sin—The Oligarchs against the Reformation—Divers Attacks

CHAPTER VII

Berne—The Provost of Watteville—First Successes of the Reformation—Haller at the Convent—Accusation and Deliverance—The Monastery of Königsfeld—Margaret of Watteville to Zuinglius—The Convent open—Two opposite Champions—Clara May and the Provost of Watteville

CHAPTER VIII

Basle—Œeolampadius—He goes to Augsburg—He enters the Convent—He returns to Sickingen—Returns to Basle—Ulric Von Hutten—His projects—Last Effort of Chivalry—Hutten dies at Uffnan

CHAPTER IX

Erasmus and Luther—Uncertainty of Erasmus—Luther to Erasmus—Work of Erasmus against Luther on Free Will—Three Opinions—Effect on Luther—Luther on Free Will—The Jansenists and the Reformers—Homage to Erasmus—Rage of Erasmus—The Three Days

CHAPTER X

The Three Adversaries—Source of the Truth—Anabaptism—Anabaptism and Zuinglius—Constitution of the Church—Prison—The Prophet Blaurock—Anabaptism at St. Gall—An Anabaptist Family—Dispute at Zurich—The limits of the Reformation—Punishment of the Anabaptists

CHAPTER XI

Popish Immobility—Protestant Progression—Zuinglius and Luther—Zuinglius and the Lord’s Supper—Luther’s great Principle—Carlstadt’s Writings Prohibited—Zuinglius’s Commentary—The Suabian Syngram—Capito and Bucer—Need of Unity in Diversity

CHAPTER XII

The Tockenburg—An Assembly of the People—Reformation—The Grisons—Discussion of Hantz—Results—Reformation at Zurich

CHAPTER XIII

Executions—Discussion at Baden—Rules of the Discussion—Riches and Poverty—Eck and Œcolampadius—Discussion—Part taken by Zuinglius—Boasting of the Romans—Insults of a Monk—End of the Discussion

CHAPTER XIV

Consequences at Basle, Berne, St. Gall, and other places—Diet at Zurich—The Small Cantons—Menaces at Berne—Foreign Aid


BOOK TWELFTH

The French.—(1500–1526.)


CHAPTER I

Universality of Christianity—Enemies of the Reformation in France—Heresy and Persecution in Dauphiny—A Gentleman’s Family—The Family Farel—Pilgrimage to St. Croix—Immorality and Superstition—William desires to become a Student

CHAPTER II

Louis XII, and the Assembly of Tours—Francis and Margaret—The Literati—Lefevre—His teaching at the University—Lefevre and Farel meet—Doubts and Inquiries of Farel—First awakening—Prophecy of Lefevre—He teaches Justification by Faith—Objections—Irregularities in Colleges—Effects on Farel—Election—Holiness of Life

CHAPTER III

Farel and the Saints—The University—Conversion of Farel—Farel and Luther—Other Disciples—Date of the Reformation in France—The different Reformation spontaneous—Which is the First?—Place due to Lefevre

CHAPTER IV

Character of Francis I—Beginning of Modern times—Liberty and Obedience—Margaret of Valois—The Court—Briçonnet, Count of Montbrun—Lefevre applies to the Bible—Francis I and his “Sons”—The Gospel brought to Margaret—A Conversion—Adoration—Character of Margaret

CHAPTER V

Enemies of the Reformation—Louisa—Duprat—Concordat at Bologna—Opposition of the Parliament and the University—The Sorbonne—Beda—His character—His Tyranny—Berquin, the most learned of the nobles—The Leaders of the Sorbonne—Heresy of the three Magdalenes—Luther Condemned at Paris—The Sorbonne addresses the King—Lefevre quits Paris for Meaux

CHAPTER VI

Briçonnet visits his Diocese—Reformation—The Reformers Prosecuted at Paris—Philibert of Savoy—Correspondence of Margaret and Briçonnet

CHAPTER VII

First beginnings of the Church of Meaux—The Scriptures in French—The Tradesmen and the Bishop—Evangelical Harvest—The Epistles of St. Paul sent to the King—Lefevre and Roma—The Monks before the Bishop—The Monks before the Parliament—Briçonnet yields

CHAPTER VIII

Lefevre and Farel Persecuted—Difference between the Lutheran and Reformed Churches—Leclere puts up his Pancartes—Leclere Branded—Zeal of Berquin—Berquin before the Parliament—Francis I saves him—Apostacy of Mazurier—Fall and grief of Pavanne—Metz—Chatelain—Peter Toussaint becomes attentive—Leclere breaks Images—Condemnation and Torture of Leclere—Martyrdom of Chatelain—Flight

CHAPTER IX

Farel and his brothers—Farel driven from Gap—He preaches in the fields—Chevalier Anemond of Coct—The Minorite—Anemond quits France—Luther to the Duke of Savoy—Farel quits France

CHAPTER X

Catholicity of the Reformation—Friendship of Farel and Œcolampadius—Farel and Erasmus—Altercation—Farel calls for a Discussion—Theses—Scripture and Faith—Discussion

CHAPTER XI

New Campaign—Calling of Farel to the Ministry—An advanced post—Lyons an Evangelical Focus—Sebville at Grenoble—Conventicles—Preaching at Lyons—Maigret in Prison—Margaret intimidated

CHAPTER XII

The French at Basle—Encouragement of the Swiss—Fear of disunion—Translations and Printing Presses at Basle—Bibles and Tracts circulated in France

CHAPTER XIII

Progress at Montbeliard—Opposition and Disturbance—Toussaint quits Œcolampadius—The day of the Bridge—Death of Anemond—Successive Defeats

CHAPTER XIV

Francis taken at Pavia—Reaction against the Reformation—Louisa consults the Sorbonne—Commission against the Heretics—Briçonnet denounced—Appeal to the Assembled Parliament—Fall—Reconciliation—Lefevre accused—Condemnation and flight—Lefevre at Strasburg—Louis de Berquin incarcerated—Erasmus attacked—SChuch at Nantz—His Martyrdom—Contest with Caroli—Sadness of Pavanne—His Faggot Pile—A Christian Hermit—Concourse at Notre Dame

CHAPTER XV

A Scholar of Noyon—Character of young Calvin—Early Education—He is devoted to Theology—The bishop gives him the tonsure—He quits Noyon because of the Plague—The Reformation creates new languages—Persecution and terror—Toussaint put into prison—Persecution gives new strength—Death of Du Blet, Merlin, and Papillon—God saves the Church—Project of Margaret—Departure for Spain



VOLUME 4


CONTENTS


BOOK THIRTEEN

The Protest and the Conference. 1526–1529


CHAPTER I

Twofold Movement of Reform—Reform the Work of God—First Diet of Spires—Palladium of Reform—Firmness of the Reformers—Proceedings of the Diet—Report of the Commissioners—The Papacy painted and described by Luther—The Destruction of Jerusalem—Instructions of Seville—Change of Policy—Holy league—Religious Liberty proposed—Crisis of the Reformation

CHAPTER II

Italian War—The Emperor’s Manifesto—March on Rome—Revolt of the Troops—The Sack of Rome—German Humours—Violence of the Spaniards—Clement VII. capitulates

CHAPTER III

Profitable Calm—Constitution of the Church—Philip of Hesse—The Monk of Marburg—Lambert’s Paradoxes—Friar Boniface—Triumph of the Gospel in Hesse—Constitution of the Church—Bishops—Synods—Two Elements of the Church—Luther on the Ministry—Organization of the Church—Luther’s contradictions on State Interference—Luther to the Elector—Melancthon’s Instructions—Disaffection—The Reformation advances—Elizabeth of Brandenburg

CHAPTER IV

Edict of Ofen—Persecutions—Winchler, Carpenter, and Keyser—Pack’s Forgery—League of the Reformed Princes—Advice of the Reformers—Luther’s Pacific Counsel—Surprise of the Papist Princes—Pack’s Scheme not improbable—Vigour of the Reformation

CHAPTER V

Alliance between Charles and Clement VII.—Omens—Hostility of the Papists—Arbitrary Proposition of Charles—Resolutions of the Diet—The Reformation in Danger—Decision of the Princes—Violence of Ferdinand—The Schism completed

CHAPTER VI

The Protest—Principles of the Protest—Supremacy of the Gospel—Christian Union—Ferdinand rejects the Protest—Attempt at Conciliation—Exultation of the Papists—Evangelical Appeal—Christian Unity a Reality—Dangers of the Protestants—The Protestants leave Spires—The Princes the true Reformers—Germany and Reform

CHAPTER VII

Union necessary to Reform—Luther’s Doctrine on the Lord’s Supper—Proposed Conference at Marburg—Melancthon and Zwingle—Zwingle leaves Zurich—The Reformers at Marburg—Carlstadt’s Petition—Preliminary Discussions—Holy Ghost—Original Sin—Baptism—Luther, Melancthon, and Zwingle—Opening of the Conference—Syllogism of Œcolampadius—The Flesh profiteth nothing—Lambert convinced—Arrival of new deputies—Christ’s Humanity finite—Testimony of the Fathers—Argument of the Velvet Cover—End of the Conference—The Landgrave mediates—Necessity of Union—Luther rejects Zwingle’s Hand—Bucer’s Dilemma—Christian Charity prevails—Luther’s Report—Unity of Doctrine—Unity in Diversity—Three Views—Germ of Popery—Luther’s Dejection—Luther’s Battle-sermon and Agony—Luther’s Firmness—Victory—Exasperation of the Papists—Threatening Prospects


BOOK FOURTEEN

The Augsburg Confession. 1530


CHAPTER I

Two striking Lessons—Charles V. in Italy—The German Envoys—Their Boldness—The Landgrave’s Present—The Envoys under arrest—Their release and Departure—Meeting of Charles and Clement—War imminent—Luther’s Objections—The Saviour is coming—Charles’s conciliatory Language—The Emperor’s Motives

CHAPTER II

The Coronation—The Emperor made a Deacon—The Romish Church and the State—Alarm of the Protestants—Bruck’s noble Advice—Articles of Faith prepared—Luther’s Strong tower—Luther at Coburg—Charles at Innspruck—Two Parties at Court—Piety of the Elector—Wiles of the Romanists

CHAPTER III

Augsburg—The Emperor’s Message—The Sermons prohibited—Firmness of the Elector—The Elector’s Reply—Preparation of the Confession—Luther’s Sinai—Luther’s Diet at Coburg—Saxony, a Paradise below—To the Bishops—Travail of the Church—Charles—The Pope’s—Letter—Melancthon on Fasting—The Church, the Judge—The Landgrave’s catholic spirit

CHAPTER IV

Agitation in Augsburg—Violence of the Imperialists—Charles’s arrival—The Nuneio’s Blessing—The Imperial Procession—Charles’s Appearance—Enters Augsburg—Te Deum—The Benediction—Brandenburg offers his Head—The Emperor’s Request for Corpus Christi—Refusal of the Princes—Agitation of Charles—The Princes oppose Tradition—Exasperation of Charles

CHAPTER V

The Sermons prohibited—Compromise proposed and accepted—The Herald—The Medley of Popery—Luther encourages the Princes—Veni Spiritus—Mass of the Holy Ghost—The Sermon—Opening of the Diet—The Elector’s Prayer—Valdez and Melancthon—No public Discussion. Evangelical Firmness prevails

CHAPTER VI

The Elector’s Zeal—The Signing of the Confession—Courage of the Princes—Melancthon’s Weakness—The Legate’s Speech—Delays. The Confession in Danger. The Protestants are firm. Luther’s Prayer and Anxiety. His Letter to Melancthon. Faith

CHAPTER VII

The 25th June 1530—The Palatine Chapel—The confession—Prologue—Justification—The Church—Free Will and Works—Faith—The Confession—Abuses—Church and State—The two Governments—Argumentation—Prudence—Church and State—The Sword—Moderate Tone of the Confession—Its Defects—A New Baptism

CHAPTER VIII

Effect on the Romanists—Luther demands religious Liberty—His Ingenuous Confessions—Hopes of the Protestants—The Emperor’s Council—Violent discussions—A Refutation proposed—Its Authors—Rome and the civil Power—Perils of the Confessors—Melancthon’s Minimum—Melancthon’s Fall—Luther opposes Concession—The Legate repels Melancthon—The Pope’s Decision—Question—Melancthon’s School-matters—Answer

CHAPTER IX

The Refutation—Charles’s dissatisfaction—Interview with the Princes—The Swiss at Augsburg—Tetrapolitan Confession—Zwingle’s Confession—Afflicting Divisions—The Elector’s Faith—His Peace—The Refutation—One Concession—Scripture and the Hierarchy—Imperial Commands—Policy of Charles—Resolutions of the Consistory—The Prayers of the Church—Two Miracles—The Emperor’s Menace—The Spectres at Spires—Tumult in Augsburg

CHAPTER X

Philip of Hesse—Temptation—Union resisted—The Landgrave’s Dissimulation—The Emperor’s Order to the Protestants—Brandenburg’s threatening Speeches—Resolution of Philip of Hesse—Flight from Augsburg—Discovery—Charles’s Emotion—Revolution in the Diet—Metamorphosis—Unusual Moderation—Peace! Peace!

CHAPTER XI

The Mixed Commission—The Three Points—Romish Dissimulation—Abuses—Concessions—The Main Question—Bishops and Pope conceded—Danger of concession—Luther’s opposing Letters—The Word above the Church—Melancthon’s Blindness—A new Commission—Concessions—The Three Points—The great Antithesis—Failure of Conciliation—The Gordian Knot—A Council granted—Charles’s Summons—Menaces—Peace or War—Romanism concedes—Protestantism resists—Luther recalls his Friends

CHAPTER XII

The Elector’s Preparatives and Indignation—Recess of Augsburg—Irritating Language—Apology of the Confession—Messages of peace—Exasperation of the Papists—Restoration of Popery—Tumult in the Church—Union of the Churches—The Pope and the Emperor—Close of the Diet—Armaments—Attack on Geneva—Establishment of Protestantism


BOOK FIFTEEN

Switzerland—Conquests. 1526–1530


CHAPTER I

Originality of the Swiss Reform—Change—Three Periods of Reform—Switzerland Romande—The two Movements in the Church—Aggressive Spirit—Farel’s new Baptism—Mysticism and Scholasticism—A Door is opened—Opposition—Lausanne—Manners of the Clergy—Farel to Galeotto—Farel and the Monk—The Tribunal—Opposition of the Ormonds—A false Convert—Christian Unity

CHAPTER II

State-Religion in Berne—Irresolution of Berne—Evangelical Majority—Haller—Zwingle’s Signal—Victory of the Gospel—Papist Provocations—Proposed Disputations—Objections of the Forest Cantons—The Church, the Judge of Controversies—Unequal Contest—Zwingle—A Christian Band—Opening of the Conference—The sole Head—Unity of Error—St. Vincent’s Day—Papist Bitterness—Necessity of Reform—Zwingle’s Sermon—Visit of the King of kings—Edict of Reform—Was the Reformation political?

CHAPTER III

The Reform accepted by the People—Faith, Purity, and Charity—First Evangelical Communion—Bernese Proposition to the Diet—Threatening storm from the Mountains—Revolt—Confusion in Berne—Energy of Berne—Victory—Political advantages

CHAPTER IV

Reformation of St. Gall—Nuns of St. Catherine—Reformation of Glaris, Berne, Appenzell, the Grisons, Schaffhausen, and the Rhine District—A Popish Miracle—Obstacles in Basle—Zeal of the Citizens—Œcolampidiusmarries—Petition of the Reformed

CHAPTER V

Crisis in Basle—Half-measures rejected—Reformed Propositions—A Night of Terror—Idols broken in the Cathedral—The Hour of Madness—Idols broken in all the Churches—Reform legalized—Erasmus in Basle—A great Transformation—Revolution and Reformation

CHAPTER VI

Farel’s Commission—Farel at Lausanne and Morat—Neufchatel—Farel preaches at Serrière—The Monks—Farel’s Preaching—Popery in Neufchatel—Canons and Monks unite—Reformation of the Bishopric of Basle—Farel again in Neufchatel—Placards—Civil Power invoked By the Romanists

CHAPTER VII

Valangin—Guillemette de Vergy—Farel goes to the Val de Ruz—The Mass interrupted—Farel in Prison—Apostles and Reformers compared—Farel preaching at Neufchatel—Installed in the Cathedral—A Whirlwind sweeps over the People—Interposition of the Governor—Triumph of the Reformed

CHAPTER VIII

The Romanists demand a Ballot—The Bernese in Favour of the Reform—Both Parties come to the Poll—The Romanists grasp the sword—The Voting—Majority for Reform—Protestantism perpetual—Retreat of the Canons—Popery and the Gospel

CHAPTER IX

Reaction preparing—Failure of the Plot—Farel in Valangin and near the Lake—De Bely at Fontaine—Farel’s Sufferings—Marcourt at Valangin—Disgraceful Expedient—Vengeance—The Reform established—French Switzerland characterized—Gathering Tempest


BOOK SIXTEEN

Switzerland—Catastrophe. 1528–1531


CHAPTER I

Two great Lessons—Christian Warfare—Zwingle, Pastor, Statesman, and General—His noble Character—Persecution—Swiss Catholics seek an Alliance with Austria—Great Dissatisfaction—Deputation to the Forest Cantons—Zwingle’s Proposal—Moderation of Berne—Keyser’s Martyrdom—Zwingle and War—Zwingle’s Error

CHAPTER II

Free Preaching of the Gospel in Switzerland—Zwingle supports the common Bailiwicks—War—Zwingle joins the Army—The Zurich Army threatens Zug—Bernese Interposition—Zwingle’s Opposition—Swiss Cordiality—A Conference—Peace restored—Austrian Treaty torn—Nuns of St. Catherine

CHAPTER III

Conquests of Reform in Schaffhausen and Zurzack—Reform in Glaris—To-day the Cowl, To-morrow the Reverse—Italian Bailiwicks—The Monk of Como—Call of the Monk of Locarno—The Monks of Wettingen—Abbey of Saint Gall—Kilian Kouffi—Saint Gall recovers its liberty—The Reform in Solcure—Popery triumphs—Address of the Ministers to the Romish Cantons—God’s Word the Means of Unity—Œcolampadius for spiritual Influence—Autonomy of the Church

CHAPTER IV

Zwingle and the Christian State—Zwingle’s double Part—Zwingle and Luther in Relation to Politics—Projected Union between Zwingle and Luther—Zwingle’s political Action—Zwingle advocates active Resistance—He destines the Imperial Crown for Philip—Embassy to Venice—Projected Alliance with France—Zwingle’s Plan of Alliance—Approaching Ruin—Violence—Mysterious Paper—Berne and Basle vote for Peace—General Diet at Baden—Evangelical Diet at Zurich—Political Reformation of Switzerland—Activity of Zurich

CHAPTER V

Diet of Arau—Helvetic Unity—Opposition of Zurich—Zwingle’s War Sermon—Blockade of the Waldstettes—No Bread, no Wine, no Salt—Indignation of the Forest Cantons—The Roads blockaded—Franco tries to conciliate—Diet at Bremgarten—Hope—The Cantons inflexible—The Strength of Zurich broken—Discontent—Zwingle’s false Position—Zwingle demands his Dismission—The Council remonstrate—He remains—Zwingle at Bremgarten—Zwingle’s Farewell to Bullinger—Zwingle’s Agony—The Forest Cantons reject all Conciliation—Zwingle’s Tranquillity

CHAPTER VI

The Five Cantons decide for War—Deceitful Calm—Fatal Inactivity—Banner of Lucerne planted—Manifesto—The Bailiwicks pillaged—Infatuation of Zurich—New Warnings—The War begins—The Tocsin—A fearful Night—Banner and Army of Zurich—Zwingle’s Departure—Zwingle’s Horse—Anna Zwingle

CHAPTER VII

The Scene of War—The Enemy at Zug—Declaration of War—Army of the Forest Cantons appears—Zwingle’s Gravity and Sorrow—Zurich Army ascending the Albis—Halt and Council at the Beech Tree—Jauch’s Reconnaissance—His Appeal—Ambuscade

CHAPTER VIII

Unforeseen Change—The whole Army advances—Universal Disorder—The Banneret’s Death—Terrible Slaughter—Slaughter of the Pastors—Zwingle’s last Words—Barbarity of the Victors—Zwingle’s dying Moments—Day after the Battle—Homage and Outrage

CHAPTER IX

Consternation in Zurich—Violence of the Populace—Grief and Distress Zwingle is dead!—Funeral Oration—Another Reverse on the Goubel Inactivity of the Bernese—Hopes and Plan of Charles V.—End of the War—Treaty of Peace

CHAPTER X

Restoration of Popery at Bremgarten and Rapperschwyl—Priests and Monks everywhere—Sorrow of Œcolampadius—Peaceful Death of Œcolampadius—Henry Bullinger at Zurich—Contrition and Exultation—The great Lesson—Conclusion



VOLUME 5


CONTENTS


BOOK XVII

England Before the Reformation


CHAPTER I

Introduction—Work of the Sixteenth Century—Unity and Diversity—Necessity of considering the entire Religious History of England—Establishment of Christianity in Great Britain—Formation of Ecclesiastical Catholicism in the Roman Empire—Spiritual Christianity received by Britain—Slavery and Conversion of Succat—His mission to Ireland—Anglo-Saxons re-establish Paganism in England—Columba at Iona—Evangelical Teaching—Presbytery and Episcopacy in Great Britain—Continental Missions of the Britons—An Omission

CHAPTER II

Pope Gregory the Great—Desires to reduce Britain—Policy of Gregory and Augustine—Arrival of the Mission—Appreciation—Britain superior to Rome—Dionoth at Bangor—First and Second Romish Aggressions—Anguish of the Britons—Pride of Rome—Rome has recourse to the Sword—Massacre—Saint Peter scourges an Archbishop—Oswald—His Victory—Corman—Mission of Oswald and Aidan—Death of Oswald

CHAPTER III

Character of Oswy—Death of Aidan—Wilfrid at Rome—At Oswald’s Court—Finan and Colman—Independence of the Church attacked—Oswy’s Conquests and Troubles—Synodus Pharensis—Cedda—Degeneration—The Disputation—Peter, the Gatekeeper—Triumph of Rome—Grief of the Britons—Popedom organized in England—Papal Exultation—Archbishop Theodore—Cedda re-ordained—Discord in the Church—Disgrace and Treachery of Wilfrid—His end—Scotland attacked—Adamnan—Iona resists—A King converted by Architects—The Monk Egbert at Iona—His History—Monkish Visions—Fall of Iona

CHAPTER IV

Clement—Struggle between a Scotchman and an Englishman—Word of God only—Clement’s Success—His condemnation—Virgil and the Antipodes—John Scotus and Philosophical Religion—Alfred and the Bible—Darkness and Popery—William the Conqueror—Wulston at Edward’s Tomb—Struggle between William and Hildebrand—The Pope yields—Cæsaropapia

CHAPTER V

Anselm’s Firmness—Becket’s Austerity—The king scourged—John becomes the Pope’s Vassal—Collison between Popery and Liberty—The Vassal King ravages his kingdom—Religion of the Senses and Superstition

CHAPTER VI

Reaction—Grostete—Principles of Reform—Contest with the Pope—Sewal—Progress of the Nation—Opposition to the Papacy—Conversion of Bradwardine—Grace is Supreme—Edward III—Statutes of Provisors and Præmunire

CHAPTER VII

The Mendicant Friars—Their Disorders and Popular Indignation—Wickliffe—His Success—Speeches of the Peers aginst the Papal Tribute—Agreement of Bruges—Courtenay and Lancaster—Wickliffe before the Convocation—Altercation between Lancaster and Courtenay—Riot—Three Briefs against Wickliffe—Wickliffe at Lambeth—Mission of the Poor Priests—Their Preachings and Persecutions—Wickliffe and the Four Regents

CHAPTER VIII

The Bible—Wickliffe’s Translation—Effects of its Publication—Opposition of the Clergy—Wickliffe’s Fourth Phasis—Transubstantiation—Excommunication—Wickliffe’s Firmness—Wat Tyler—The Synod—The condemned Propositions—Wickliffe’s Petition—Wickliffe before the Primate at Oxford—Wickliffe summoned to Rome—His answer—The Trialogue—His Death—And Character—His Teaching—His Ecclesiastical Views—A Prophecy

CHAPTER IX

The Wickliffites—Call for Reform—Richard II—The first Martyr—Lord Cobham—Appears before Henry V—Before the Archbishop—His Confession and Death—The Lollards

CHAPTER X

Learning at Florence—The Tudors—Erasmus visits England—Sir Thomas More—Dean Colet—Erasmus and young Henry—Prince Arthur and Catherine—Marriage and Death—Catherine betrothed to Henry—Accession of Henry VIII—Enthusiasm of the Learned—Erasmus recalled to England—Cromwell before the Pope—Catherine proposed to Henry—Their Marriage and Court—Tournaments—Henry’s Danger

CHAPTER XI

The Pope excites to War—Colet’s Sermon at St. Paul’s—The Flemish Campaign—Marriage of Louis XII and Princess Mary—Letter from Anne Boleyn—Marriage of Brandon and Mary—Oxford—Sir Thomas More at Court—Attack upon the Monasteries—Colet’s Household—He preaches Reform—The Greeks and Trojans

CHAPTER XII

Wolsey—His first Commission—His complaisance and Diocesses—Cardinal, Chancellor, and Legate—Ostentation and Necromaney—His Spies and Enmity—Pretensions of the clergy

CHAPTER XIII

The Wolves—Richard Hun—A Murder—Verdict of the Jury—Hun condemned, and his Character vindicated—The Gravesend Passage-boat—A festival disturbed—Brown tortured—Visit from his Wife—A Martyr—Character of Erasmus—1516 and 1517—Erasmus goes to asle


BOOK XVIII

The Revival of the Church


CHAPTER I

Four reforming Powers—Which reformed England?—Papal Reform?—Episcopal Reform?—Royal Reform?—What is required in a legitimate Reform—The Share of the Kingly Power—Share of the Episcopal Authority—High and Low Church—Political Events—The Greek and Latin New Testament—Thoughts of Erasmus—Enthusiasm and anger—Desire of Erasmus—Clamours of the Priests—Their Attack at Court—Astonishment of Erasmus—His Labours for this Work—Edward Lee; his Character—Lee’s Tragedy—Conspiracy

CHAPTER II

Effects of the New Testament in the Universities—Conversations—A Cambridge Fellow—Bilney buys the New Testament—The first Passage—His Conversion—Protestantism, the Fruit of the Gospel—The Vale of the Severn—William Tyndale—Evangelization at Oxford—Bilney teaches at Cambridge—Fryth—Is Conversion Possible?—True Consecration—The Reformation has begun

CHAPTER III

Alarm of the Clergy—The Two Days—Thomas Man’s Preaching—True real Presence—Persecutions at Coventry—Standish preaches at St. Paul’s—His Petition to the King and Queen—His Arguments and Defeat—Wolsey’s Ambition—First Overtures—Henry and Francis Candidates for the Empire—Conference between Francis I and Sir T. Boleyn—The Tiara promised to Wolsey—The cardinal’s Intrigues with Charles and Francis

CHAPTER IV

Tyndale—Sodbury Hall—Sir John and Lady Walsh—Table-Talk—The Holy Scriptures—The Images—The Anchor of Faith—A Roman Camp—Preaching of Faith and Works—Tyndale accused by the Priests—They tear up what he has planted—Tyndale resolves to translate the Bible—His first triumph—The Priests in the taverns—Tyndale summoned before the Chancellor of Worcester—Consoled by an aged Doctor—Attacked by a schoolman—His Secret becomes known—He leaves Sodbury Hall

CHAPTER V

Luther’s Works in England—Consultation of the Bishops—The Bull of Leo X published in England—Luther’s books burnt—Letter of Henry VIII—He undertakes to write against Luther—Cry of Alarm—Tradition and Sacramentalism—Prudence of Sir T. More—The Book presented to the Pope—Defender of the Faith—Exultation of the king

CHAPTER VI

Wolsey’s Machinations to obtain the Tiara—He gains Charles V—Alliance between Henry and Charles—Wolsey offers to command the Troops—Treaty of Bruges—Henry believes himself King of France—Victories of Francis I—Death of Leo X

CHAPTER VII

The Just Men of Lincolnshire—Their Assemblies and Teaching—Agnes and Morden—Itinerant Libraries—Polemical Conversations—Sarcasm—Royal Decree and Terror—Depositions and Condemnations—Four Martyrs—A Conclave—Charles consoles Wolsey

CHAPTER VIII

Character of Tyndale—He arrives in London—He preaches—The Cloth and the Ell—The bishop of London gives Audience to Tyndale—He is dismissed—A Christian Merchant of London—Spirit of Love in the Reformation—Tyndale in Monmouth’s House—Fryth helps him to translate the New Testament—Importunities of the Bishop of Lincoln—Persecution in London—Tyndale’s Resolution—He d

What's New in Version 1.0 (See full changelog)

  • All Content links implimented by calvinist4life, portrait added by calvinist4life, other formatting by calvinist4life, about the author information originates from the web (links provided). None of the original content has been edited or altered or abridged and originates from a trustworthy source. This public domain resource is free, through reading this resource, may God bless you richly, according to His will, for His eternal glory. amen.



Other files you may be interested in ..





9 user(s) are online (in the past 30 minutes)

0 members, 9 guests, 0 anonymous users